Wood Air Grille with Ogee Edge

Thanks to our friend Neil in Connecticut for the great photo of his Wood Return Air Grille with the ogee edge upgrade from WoodAirGrille.com. His is installed with cabinet magnets on the back to enable the grille to be easily removed for access.

Return Air Grille with Ogee option by WoodAirGrille

Wood Return Air Grilles

Wood Return Air Grilles from WoodAirGrille.com come in a variety of sizes.

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Folding Bicycle Workstand

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This stand has received relentless use and provides a stable base for working on all different kinds of bicycles. A bike can be positioned in many different ways and the stand folds up and leans neatly against a corner in my closet. The height of the bicycle clamp and the tool shelf are both adjustable which comes in very handy.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Supplies

Material List:

1 – 1 x 4 x 8’ Birch or similar hardwood frame stock for backbone, top jaw section, shelf and shelf bracket

2 – 1 x 2 x 8’ Birch or similar hardwood frame stock for backbone, legs, leg braces, shelf bracket

1 – 1 x 6 x 3’ Birch or similar hardwood frame stock for head support component

1 – 2 x 4 x 3’ SYP or Douglass Fur or hardwood stock for lower jaw and backbone wedge parts, shelf sides.

1 – 2 1/2” dia. X 1/4” hex bolt universal threaded knob

4 – 1 3/4” dia. X 1/4” hex bolt universal threaded knob

4 – 1/4″ Washers

1 – 2 1/2” x 1/2” x .047 compression spring

3 – 1/4 – 20 x 3/4” cross dowels

3 – 1/4 – 20 x 5/8” T-Nut

1 – 1/4 –20 x 5” full thread hex bolt

5 – 1/4 –20 x 2 1/4” full thread hex bolts

1 – 3” Hinge with 3/4” screws

4 – 2” x 1” strap hinges with 5/8” screws

3 – #8 x 2” wood screws

25 – #8 x 1 1/2” wood screws

1 – 1 3/4” dia. X 1/4” hex bolt universal threaded knob

3-5 – Screws, nails, dowels or hooks for tool hangars

14-18 – 1” brads or 1” 18 gauge nail gun nailsAdd TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 1: Material Cut Sheet

Material Cut Sheet

A – 2 pieces from 1 x 6 stock – 7 1/2” per template for head assembly

B – 1 piece from 1 x 6 stock – 10” per template for head assembly

C – 1 piece from 1 x 4 stock – 10” for upper Jaw

D – 1 piece from 2 x 4 stock – 10” for lower Jaw

E – 1 piece from 1 x 2 stock – 60” for backbone

F – 1 piece from 1 x 4 stock – 60” for backbone

G – 2 pieces from 2 x 4 stock – 8” for hinge mount wedges

H – 2 pieces from 1 x 4 stock – 18” for leg Braces

J – 2 pieces from 1 x 4 stock – 32” for legs

M – 2 pieces from 1 x 2 stock – 7 ” per template for shelf bracket

N – 1 piece from 1 x 4 stock – 4” per template for shelf bracket

O – 1 piece from 1 x 4 stock – 11 1/2” for shelf

P – 2 pieces from 2 x 4 stock – 12” for shelf sides

Q – 2 pieces from 2 x 4 stock – 4” shelf sidesAdd TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 2:

1. Cut parts A & B using Template 1 and Template 2. You can use the measurements or cut out and trace the template onto a piece of 1×6 stock.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 3:

1. A template needs to be made to set the adjustable height holes. Use a 5 1/2” piece of 1×2 frame stock with 2 holes, 1/4” in diameter, 4” apart. See Fig. 1. The holes should be 1” from one side to be aligned with the back side of the head assembly and the back side of the backbone component E.

Now drill the holes in Parts A. You will want to drill through both at the same time to ensure they align to each other and that the jaws will mount squarely and securely. The holes in parts A should be 4” apart. Stack the 2 parts A on top of each other and then place the drilling template you just made on top, aligning it with the back edge. With the use of the template or a drill press, be sure the holes are drilled straight.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 4:

1. Assemble Parts A and B with glue and 8 #8—1 1/2” wood screws. Predrilling and countersinking is recommended. I prefer to use a 1/8” bit to drill through both pieces, enlarge the hole on the pass-through part, (parts A in this case) with a 11/64” – 5/32” bit so the screw draws the parts firmly together when tightened. See Fig. 2.

Use the hole drilling template as a guide to ensure that part B is 1 1/2” from the back of parts A. See Fig. 3Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 5:

The holes on one side of parts A will need to be enlarged for the T-nuts. Using a 5/16” drill bit, enlarge the 1/4” hole on one side of part A about halfway through. See Fig. 4.

Place a piece of 3/4” scrap lumber between the gap in parts A before tapping in the T-nuts into place with a hammer. This is to prevent splitting the Part A. If you are finishing this piece you may want to tap these in after finishing.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 6:

With the support part of the head assembly complete, it’s time to move onto the jaws. Cut a 10” piece of 1 x 4 for the upper Jaw Part C. Cut the 10” lower part D from a piece of 2 x 4. See Fig. 5 & 6. I do not recommend using typical 2 x 4 framing lumber. Douglass Fur or Southern Yellow Pine that is fully dried is an acceptable selection. A 2 x 4 section of hardwood is preferable. You can achieve the same result by using 2 pieces of the same 1 x 4 lumber as Backbone part F.

Using a 3/8” to 1/2” spacer between part C & D drill a 1 1/4” hole with the center at 1 1/4” from the front of the jaw and 1 5/8” from the bottom of the jaw. See Fig 5 & 6.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 7:

We now need to drill the hole for the clamp bolt. The hole should be 1/2” in diameter. This is larger than the 1/4” bolt you will be using to allow for tilt movement. It may be necessary to enlarge parts of the holes once assembly is complete to allow for smooth operation of the jaw. The hole should be 4” from the front of the jaw and centered at 1 3/4”. See Fig. 7.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 8:

Using a 1 1/4” Forstner bit, the hole inside the lower part of the jaw will need to be enlarged. This is to create a pocket for the compressed spring to recess into and to allow some movement of the washer it rests on as the position of the through bolt will change slightly as the jaw opens and closes. See Fig. 8 & 9.

Though it is not necessary, I prefer to trim the front edges of the jaw at a 45° angle.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 9:

It is easier to go ahead and mount the 3” hinge to the upper and lower jaw parts C & D now because you can lay it 180° open on you workbench.

Using an appropriate amount of wood glue it is time to join the head assembly parts A & B with the lower jaw part D. Reinforce the glue with 3 #8 – 2” wood screws. One should penetrate the front edge of Head part B and 2 should penetrate the back of the head parts A as shown. Predrilling is essential and countersinking is highly recommended. I prefer to use a 1/8” bit to drill through both pieces, enlarge the hole on the pass-through part, (part A & B in this case) with a 11/64” – 5/32” bit so the screw draws the parts firmly together when tightened. See Fig. 10.

With the Jaw mounted to the head of the stand, we need to finish the hole for the clamp bolt. Open the jaw and using a 1/2” drill bit, insert the bit into the 1/2” hole in the lower jaw part D and spin the drill just enough to create a small center indentation. Replace the 1/2” bit with a 3/8” bit and using the indentation you just created to find center, drill through head part B.

Using a square mark across the center of the hole at the top of the lower jaw part D and the hole at the bottom of head part B to establish a center line of the hole going through both pieces. Drill a 25/64” hole through that center line in part B for the cross dowel. The 2 holes should intersect each other. NOTE: The 25/64” hole for 1/4” cross dowels are just a tiny bit larger than 3/8”, but I will just run the 3/8” bit in and out a few times to enlarge the hole rather than buying a 25/64” drill bit. If you choose this method, remember to take just a little material at a time, test fit, then repeat as many times as you need to.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 10:

To complete the assembly of the head and jaw, we need to install the hardware. First, insert the cross-dowel into the hole in part B and index the threads in line with the intersecting hole. Insert a 6” 1/4-20 hex bolt through the universal knob. Slide a 3/8” washer up the bolt and insert it through the upper jaw C. Place the spring on the bolt with a 3/8” washer on either side and slide the bolt through the lower Jaw part D into the threads of the cross-dowel in part A. Thread the bolt into the cross-dowel and clamp the jaws all the way down to make sure there is no binding. IF the bolt binds, enlarge the offending part of the hole slightly. See Fig. 11.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 11:

Set the assembly aside and begin working on the backbone. Cut a piece of 1×2 frame stock and a piece of 1×4 stock down to 60”. Set the 1×4 aside for now.

Using the template from Step 2, drill 8 holes, 1/4” in diameter in Part E. Starting from one end, drill 2 holes with the template clamped in place. Move the template down so the top hole of the template aligns with the bottom hole in Part E. Insert one of the 1/4” bolts into the hole that is aligned at the top and drill the second hole. Continue this process downward until you have drilled 6 Holes. This progressive process ensures the holes will align smoothly with the assembled parts A & B. See Fig. 12.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 12:

To assemble the backbone, start by drawing a line down the center of the back of part F. Apply glue to the back side of Part E, (this is the side 1” away from the holes drilled in step 18. See Fig. 13.

Center Part E perpendicular to part F on the front side and clamp the 2 pieces together. Using the center line on the back of part F, pre-drill and countersink holes for #8, 1 1/4” screws about every 8”..

Screw Backbone parts E & F tightly together. See Fig. 13.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 13:

Once the glue has set, trim the bottom of the assembly at a 9° angle. Fig. 14.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 14:

The legs attach to triangular shaped brackets, parts G, attached to the backbone. Parts G are rip cut from 2×4 material at a 45° angle and cut to 8” in length. The 90° sides should be 1 1/4”. See Fig. 15.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 15:

Attach the Parts G to the backbone parts E & F 7” from the bottom of the backbone using glue and 6 #8 x 1 1/4” screws. Predrill the screw holes to prevent cracking and countersink the screws so they don’t interfere with the hinges to be installed later. See Fig. 16 & 17.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 16:

The legs and leg braces are next. The 2 braces , parts H, will need to be chamfered 1/2” on 2 sides at a 45° angle to fit neatly within the backbone when folded. They should be cut to 14” in length. See Fig. 18.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 17:

Cut 2 pieces of 1×2 at 32” for the 2 legs, parts J.

With all of the leg pieces cut, it’s time to connect them to the backbone. At the bottom of Part G, attach the leg to the backbone with a 2” x strap hinge.

At the top of Part G, attach the leg brace to the backbone with a 2” strap Hinge. See Fig. 19.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 18:

On a level surface, stand the assembly up so that the angle cut on the bottom of the backbone is touching as much of the floor as possible. Clamp a scrap piece of wood to each leg, parts J, at approximately where the Braces, Parts H, intersect. This is roughly 11 from the backbone. Allow the braces to rest against the scrap lumber and adjust the clamped scrap lumber until the assembly is standing plumb from side to side and 9° leaning forward. See Fig. 20.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 19:

Once you are satisfied with the assembly’s position, drill a 1/4” hole through parts H & J keeping the hole perpendicular to part H. This is so the base of the threaded knob will be flat against part H.

Using a square, mark the center of the hole through the top and bottom of part J and draw a line connecting the 2 centers to produce a line on the side parallel to the center of the hole you just drilled. Using a 25/64” drill bit, measure 1 1/4” from the head of the bit and wrap masking tape around the bit at that point. The masking tape will serve as a guide to let you know to stop at 1 1/4” deep. (If you only have a 3/8” drill bit, follow the same procedure, just run the bit in and out several times.

Insert the cross dowel into the 25/64” hole and tighten the 2 1/2” threaded knob. Make adjustments as necessary. See Fig. 21

Repeat for the other leg.

Remove the clamps and scrap lumber.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 20:

The next step is to create the latching system that will allow the work stand to fold up securely. Remove the threaded knobs that hold the angle braces, parts H, to the legs, parts J, and set them aside. Fold both the angle braces, parts H, and the Legs, parts J, parallel to the backbone. See Fig. 22.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 21:

At about 6” from the end of the legs, parts J, drill a 1/4” hole through both legs, parts J, passing through Part E of the backbone parallel to the face of part F of the backbone. See Fig. 23.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 22:

Mark the hole centers on either side of backbone part E and drill a 25/64 (or run a 3/8” bit in and out several times) through the center of backbone part E as shown. See Fig. 24.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 23:

Insert a 1/4”-20 x 3/4” cross dowel into the 25/64” hole in the front of Backbone Part E. See Fig. 25.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 24:

The 2 threaded knobs used to secure the angle braces, parts H, to the legs, parts J, when the work stand is open, are now used to hold the work stand closed. Pass a threaded knob through each of legs, parts J, in the folded position and into the cross dowel imbedded in backbone part E. Give each knob about 2 full turns to secure the unit closed. They share a single cross dowel so you are only wanting to thread it just enough to secure it. The opposing angles of the legs and the threaded bolts effectively hold it closed. See Fig. 26.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 25:

The last component is the tool shelfAdd TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 26:

Cut Components “M” from a piece of 1×2 stock according to Template 3.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 27:

1. Using the template from the head assembly (fig 12), put both Parts “M” together and drill a 1/4” hole through both pieces at the same time to ensure they align to each other and that the shelf will mount squarely and securely. Stack the 2 parts M on top of each other and then place the drilling template you just made on top, aligning it with the back edge. See Fig. 30.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 28:

1. The hole on the right side of one of the Part M components will need to be enlarged for the T-nuts. Using a 5/16” drill bit, enlarge the 1/4” hole on the right side of Part M about halfway through. Using a hammer, tap in a 1/4-20 T-Nut See Fig. 31.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 29:

1. After cutting Part N from a piece of 1 x 4 stock according to Template 3, use 2 #8 x 1 1/2” wood screws and glue, attach parts M to either side of Part N. Part N should be 1 1/2” forward of parts M to allow clearance for the backbone. See Fig. 32 and Fig. 33.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 30:

Cut a 11 1/2” piece of 1×4 stock for the shelf. This is part O.

Procure a piece of 2×4 material at least 12” long, preferably quality material as suggested for part D of the jaws, but, even inexpensive building studs will work. If you use cheap material like this, be prepared to work around knots and checks in the wood. Rip cut 3 pieces about 3/8” thick. When you are done, you should have 3 pieces of lumber 3/8” x 1 1/2” x 12”. You can also just purchase screen mold from most home centers that is 1/4” x 1 1/2”.

Cut the 1/4” x 1 1/2” parts P & Q to fit around the shelf part O as shown in Fig 34 & 35. Secure with glue and some 1” brad nails. If you like, add a few nails or screws on the front and/or sides of the shelf assembly to hang tools as shown in Fig. 34. Since the Parts P & Q are only 1/4” thick, it is a good idea to pre-drill to prevent splitting these pieces, even if you are just using nails.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 31:

Mark the center of the shelf and predrill 2 holes through the bottom of the shelf. The holes should be 3/4” on either side of the center line so they line up with Parts H of the bracket. You will want to drill countersinks as well so you have a flat surface on your shelf.

Attach the shelf assembly to the bracket assembly as shown in Fig. 36 using glue and 2 #8 x 1 1/2” wood screws.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 32:

On the back of part N in the Bracket Assembly, pre-drill, countersink and install a #8 x 1 1/2” wood screw as shown in Fig. 37. this will serve as an adjustment screw to level the shelf. Simply tighten or loosen the screw to adjust the shelf.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 33:

Attach the shelf assembly to one of the unused holes in the backbone of the bike stand with a 2 1/2” 1/4”-20 threaded knob as shown in Fig. 38 and your tool shelf is ready to use.Add TipAsk QuestionCommentDownload

Step 34:

Exploded view